Sunday, December 15, 2013

Is Kindle Self Publishing Worth the Effort?


Having been on the internet since 1997, I have tried out a lot of different things to make money with my writing. From websites to content mills to micro-tasks, and now I am doing Kindle self publishing. Of all the methods for writers to make money online, I have found Kindle self publishing to be the most lucrative.

The website I ran did great while it lasted. I monetized using Amazon.com (my top money maker on the site), Commission Junction, and AdSense. On the downside, I had a lot of problems with content theft and, after much battling with every teenager who wanted to build a site similar to my own, I gave up and got rid of the website.

I went on to work for the content mills. I drilled out a lot of content with only a tiny bit of return. I was not making close to what I made on my main website and I was doing 5 times the work.

My latest online job is writing books for Kindle. I have 4 active pen names that I write under, and I am earning more from Kindle than I did with the website and writing for content mills.

Is Kindle self publishing worth the effort? It is for me. I self publish non-fiction books that are roughly 50 pages in length each. I am making a decent living off the sales, and I am anxious to get more published.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Can You Make Money Publishing an Ebook?


Many people ask this question while dreaming of seeing their name in print and bringing in the millions. I have news for you, this seldom happens (the millions of dollar part). But, if you tone down your dreams and work to build good, interesting, well-written books, then yes, you can make a decent amount of money publishing ebooks.

Most people who make a living wage publishing their ebooks have well over 20 ebooks up for sale. If you are aiming to make 6 digits a year, you will need to write more books - perhaps over 100 books.

The more ebooks you publish, the better. That is my personal motto.

Friday, December 13, 2013

Can You Make Money Writing a Book?


I publish Kindle books under various pen names. Yes, a person can make money writing books. The trick is to be able to write well. If you are a terrible writer or English is a second language for you, chances are slim to none that you will be able to make money publishing books. If you are determined, you will need to hire a good editor who can read through and correct your grammar and trim up your sentence structure.

If you are good at writing, you will next need a topic to write about. Non-fiction writing is a popular "sport" because many people find research and writing easy to do. There are others that write fictional stories and sell them for 99 cents on Kindle. You won't make a lot of money on just one book, but if you have 50 or more fictional works up for 99 cents and they are good, quick reads, you will make a nice chunk of change.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

How to Freeze Muffin Batter


The majority of muffin recipes make 12 or more muffins. If only one or two people are going to be eating the muffins, a dozen or more muffins are simply too much to make at one time. Besides, you like the muffins when they are fresh out of the oven. One way to make the most of your muffin batter and always have freshly baked muffins is to freeze the muffin batter.

First you will need to fill a muffin tin with foil liners, not the paper ones. Fill the liners with the muffin batter and freeze. Once the batter is completely frozen, an hour or more, transfer the frozen muffins, liner and batter, into a freezer bag. Store in the freezer until ready to use. When ready, remove the amount of muffins your want to bake. Place them back into the muffin tin, and bake as you normally would, adding an extra 8 minutes or more to the time. Bake until done.

Substitute for Brown Sugar

 Brown sugar is sugar with a small percentage of the molasses (a by-product of sugar) left in. If you find yourself without brown sugar, you can substitute it by mixing molasses with granulated sugar. For each cup of granulated sugar you need, add 2 teaspoons molasses.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Shelf Life of Baking Powder


Once opened, baking powder has a short shelf life. In the best of conditions, cool temperature and no dampness, it may last up to a year and a half. In less than ideal conditions, baking powder will last only 3 months.

To test the potency of an opened container of baking powder, mix 1/4 teaspoon baking powder with 1 tablespoon of water. If it bubbles, the baking powder is still good.

Monday, December 2, 2013

Get Natural Vitamins and Minerals from the Food You Eat


You don't need to spend a fortune on buying vitamins. Consider, instead, getting your vitamins and minerals from natural food sources. The benefits of doing this include:

  • Learning to eat healthier.
  • Possible weight loss as you cut out the foods that don't provide you with healthy nutrition.
  • You and your family will feel healthier.

Here is a list of vitamins and minerals and the foods you can get them from naturally.

Vitamin A

  • Orange and yellow fruits and vegetables
  • Butternut squash
  • Cantaloupe
  • Carrots
  • Cayenne
  • Dried apricots
  • Liver
  • Paprika
  • Sweet potatoes
Vitamin B6
  • Tuna
  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Potatoes
  • Cod
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Spinach
  • Banana
  • Avocado
Vitamin B12
  • Oysters
  • Mussels
  • Liver
  • Smoked salmon
  • Herring
  • Tuna
  • Canned sardines
  • Crab
  • Crayfish
  • Shrimp
  • Lobster
  • Soy
Beta Carotene
  • Peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Carrots
  • Spinach
  • Dandelion greens
  • Mustard greens
  • Pumpkin
  • Chard
  • Collards
  • Fresh parsley
  • Fresh basil
  • Sweet potato
  • Winter squash
  • Oranges
  • Peaches
  • Cantaloupe
Bioflavonoids
  • Citrus fruits
  • Green peppers
  • Cherries
  • Grapes
  • Broccoli
  • Strawberries
  • Brussel sprouts
Biotin
  • Molasses
  • Swiss chard
  • Brewer's yeast
  • Carrots
  • Soy
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Oats
  • Peanuts
  • Cauliflower
Boron
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Grapes
  • Raisins
  • Peanuts
  • Beans
  • Corn
  • Prunes
Vitamin C
  • Citrus fruits
  • Peppers
  • Strawberries
  • Broccoli
  • Tomatoes
  • Cantaloupe
  • Chives
  • Parsley
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Horseradish
  • Taro
  • Cauliflower
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Pears
Calcium
  • Yogurt
  • Cheese
  • Tofu
  • Sesame seeds
  • Sardines
  • Spinach
  • Collard greens
  • Scallops
Chromium
  • Brewer's yeast
  • Broccoli
  • Onions
  • Tomatoes
  • Oysters
  • Thyme
  • Whole grains
  • Black pepper
Copper
  • Liver
  • Nuts
  • Oysters
  • Cocoa
  • Sesame seeds
  • Cherries
  • Lobster
  • Mushrooms
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Basil
  • Marjoram
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Parsley
Vitamin D
  • Fish oil
  • Herring
  • Catfish
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Halibut
  • Trout
  • Sardines
  • Shrimp
Vitamin E
  • Wheat germ oil
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Corn oil
  • Hazelnuts
  • Peanuts
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach
  • Tomato
Folic Acid
  • Spinach
  • Liver
  • Beans
  • Kale
  • Oranges
  • Chicken
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Broccoli
  • Pork
Iron
  • Red meat
  • Swiss chard
  • Dried apricots
  • Chicken
  • Parsley
  • Fish
  • Spinach
  • Tofu
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Peas
  • Coconut
  • Beans
  • Olives
  • Lentil sprouts
Vitamin K
  • Parsley
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Watercress
  • Spinach
  • Mustard greens
  • Fresh basil
  • Collards
  • Dandelion greens
  • Endive
  • Lettuce
Lecithin
  • Oats
  • Soy
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Eggs
  • Seaweed
Magnesium
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Sesame seeds
  • Brazil nuts
  • Cashews
  • Almonds
  • Pine nuts
  • Beans
  • Whole grains
  • Bananas
  • Avocados
  • Dark chocolate
Niacin
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Chicken
  • Pork
  • Liver
  • Peanuts
  • Mushrooms
  • Beef
  • Peas
Potassium
  • Beans
  • Spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • Kale
  • Collards
  • Potatoes
  • Dried apricots
  • Acorn squash
  • Zucchini
  • Yogurt
  • Fish
  • Mushrooms
  • Avocados
  • Bananas
Riboflavin
  • Coffee
  • Yogurt
  • Beef
  • Cottage cheese
  • Pork
  • Lamb
  • Broccoli
  • Asparagus
  • Chicken
Thiamin
  • Whole grain wheat and rye
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Pork
  • Fish
  • Oats
  • Brown rice
  • Coriander leaves
  • Poppy seeds
  • Sage
  • Nuts
  • Green peas
  • Paprika
  • Mustard seed
  • Rosemary
  • Thyme
Zinc
  • Endive
  • Oysters
  • Squash
  • Zucchini
  • Crab
  • Spinach
  • Beef
  • Asparagus
  • Mushrooms
  • Chicken
  • Alfalfa sprouts
  • Parsley

Sunday, December 1, 2013

How to Grow Long Healthy Hair Naturally


We all want it - long healthy hair that shines naturally. For the past 2 decades, I have practiced numerous natural methods for growing long, healthy hair and I have tried many store products. The natural methods work. The store products, however, never worked for my hair and often did more damage to my hair.

Apricot Kernel Oil

Apricot kernel oil is a light oil. It is a popular natural massage oil because it quickly absorbs into the skin. As a oil treatment for hair, it is wonderful and is easily washed out so that your hair is left soft and not greasy.

To use apricot kernel oil as a hair treatment, simply put a small amount of it in the palm of your hand and massage it into your hair. Wrap your hair in a towel to keep the warmth on your head and allow the oil to absorb for 30 minutes. Wash your hair as you normally do and your hair should feel softer after it is dry.

Coconut Oil

I became a staunch coconut oil user a few months ago. Coconut oil is very healthy for you and it can be eaten to help give your hair a natural shine. I eat about a tablespoon a day of extra virgin coconut oil. Within the first month, my hair began to show a natural shine. My skin, too, developed a healthy glow.

Using coconut oil as an oil treatment for your hair is very simple. Once a week, if you have damaged hair, put a small amount (less than half a teaspoon as this oil covers a lot of territory) of coconut oil in your hand. Let your body heat warm and melt the oil in your hand. Massage the oil into your hair and scalp. Leave it in for at least 30 minutes or overnight. Wash your hair as you normally do. After a month of doing this every monday, my hair growth was healthy and my dry, brittle ends were no longer frizzy.

Biotin

There are health supplements that are said to improve the health of hair. Biotin is the most popular, but you needn't buy expensive supplements when you can learn to make slight changes to your diet to increase your biotin intake naturally.

You can get biotin naturally by eating:


  • brewer's yeast
  • cauliflower
  • raw egg yolk (the yellow)
  • lentils
  • liver
  • molasses
  • oats
  • peanuts
  • soybeans
  • swiss chard
  • walnuts
  • wheat bran


Create a Routine

The hardest part of improving the health of your hair is creating a routine and sticking to it. However, if you make small changes, you are less likely to fail.

For example, set up a chart for yourself. Choose one day a week to give your hair an oil treatment. Set up a daily reminder to eat something with biotin in it, such as a 1/4 cup of walnut or a tablet of brewer's yeast. Try eating a spoonful of unrefined coconut oil eat day to give your hair a natural shine.

Make your changes small and, in time, you will have healthier hair, naturally.